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Difference between revisions of "Design and Implementation of ultra low power vision system"

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[[Category:Hot]] [[Category:Digital]] [[Category:Semester Thesis]] [[Category:Master Thesis]] [[Category:Available]] [[Category:UlpSoC]]
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[[Category:Hot]] [[Category:Digital]] [[Category:Semester Thesis]] [[Category:Master Thesis]] [[Category:Available]] [[Category:System Design]]

Revision as of 16:00, 3 February 2015

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Short Description

In recent years battery operated embedded devices such as wearable device are growing on a wide range of application and volumes. Usually these devices are equipped with several sensors such as accelerometers, acoustic MEMS, temperature and other. For power consumption constrains images sensors are rarely used. In fact image sensors are usually power hungry sensors able to capture images and video very well but with high power budget. For this reason the power consumption is a key factor and ultra low power image sensors can play an important role in this type of devices and in general in battery-operated embedded system.

Your task will be to connect an analog ultra low power image sensors (4mW) with a ultra low power microcontroller MSP430 from Texas Instruments, write the firmware needed to capture an image, store the image on the non volatile RAM on board of the microcontroller and perform simple image processing. Finally measurements of power consumption in all the steps from acquisition to the processing will be evaluate.

Status: Available

Looking for Interested Students
Supervisors: Michele Magno

Prerequisites

C Language
Interest in Computer Architectures at system level

Character

20% Theory
60% Firmware
20% System integration and measurements

Professor

Luca Benini

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Detailed Task Description

Goals

Practical Details

Results